East Farndon Village


The East Farndon men who fought in the First World War 

(Information on these men will appear in due course)


The following are recorded on the War Memorial and on the plaque in the church as having died in service:

A.Owen Allen


(Alfred) Owen was born in East Farndon during April/May 1893, which is when his birth was registered. He was baptised on 21st May 1893 in East Farndon.

He was the son of William Lee Allen and Mary Jane Clifford. William was a farm labourer at the time of Alfred’s birth, but on the 1901 census he was a shepherd. In 1901 the family lived on Harborough Road, East Farndon: William (34 and a shepherd), Mary Jane (37), Ada (14), Agnes (12), Alfred (7), David (6) and Annie (2).

In 1911, the family was living at Church Cottage, East Farndon: William (45, shepherd and parish clerk), his wife Mary Jane (47) and 2 of their children – Annie Elizabeth (12) and Cecil Francis (3).  Alfred was aged 17 and was living at Ivy Lodge, Theddingworth, where he was working as a farm servant for George Haynes (grazier). He was known as Owen Allen on the census.

Alfred was a private in the 1st Battalion, Northamptonshire Regiment (number 9389). His battalion landed in Le Havre on August 13th 1914 and he was killed in action shortly afterwards on 15th September 1914, aged 21. He is remembered at the Vendresse British Cemetery.


D.C. Allen

 

David was the younger brother of Alfred Owen Allen. He was born in East Farndon on 24th March 1895 and baptised on 19th May 1895. His parents were William Lee Allen and Mary Jane Clifford. William was a farm labourer at the time.

In 1901 the family lived on Harborough Road, East Farndon: William (34 and a shepherd), Mary Jane (37), Ada (14), Agnes (12), Alfred (7), David (6) and Annie (2).

In 1911, the family was living at Church Cottage, East Farndon: William (45, shepherd and parish clerk), wife Mary Jane (47) and 2 of their children – Annie Elizabeth (12) and Cecil Francis (3). David was aged 16 and was living in Clipston, where he was working as a farm servant for Henry Ward (farmer).

He was a guardsman in the Coldstream Guards Machine Gun Regiment (number 1457), and his older brother Alfred was killed in action in France and Flanders on September 15th 1914. David died on 1st November 1919, aged 24. His death was registered in Leicester, so he had clearly returned home from active service. It is understood anecdotally that it was from the effects of mustard gas. He is buried in the south of the graveyard of St John the Baptist, East Farndon. His headstone reads “His End was Peace”.


J. Andrews

James was born in Shoreditch, London in 1885.

In 1901 the family was living in Lathkill Street, Little Bowden, Market Harborough: William (40, type founder), Mary (36), James (16, type hand), Sarah (15, type hand), Walter (10), Charles (8), Amy (3) and Edith (10 months). The entire family was born in London, so they had clearly only recently moved to Market Harborough.

On 21st August 1909, aged 24, James married Charlotte Elizabeth Croft (1889 -1975 and known as Elizabeth) in Clipston, where they were both living. James was working as a type founder. They went on to have 3 children: Margaret Ellen (1910 – 1986), Frances Alice (1911 – 1983) and James Edward (1911 – 2009).

In 1911 he was living in East Farndon with wife (Charlotte) Elizabeth (22) and daughter Margaret (1, born in Market Harborough). Also living with them was Leonard Croft (19, a horseman on a farm), who was Elizabeth’s brother. The census states that James was born in Shoreditch, London and was working as a type founder.

In 1914 he enlisted with the Leicester Regiment, 8th Battalion (army number 13071) on a Short Service Attestation (3 years with the colours). He was 29 and a labourer at the time.

He was killed in action in France and Flanders on 9th October 1917, aged 36.

(Note: His widow Elizabeth remarried in 1924 to Frank Tailby. She died in Kettering in 1975).

Note: 8th Battalion, Leicester Regiment was raised in Leicester in September 1914 as part of Kitchener’s Third New Amy and joined 23rd Division as Divisional Troops. In April 1915 they transferred to 110th Brigade, 38th Division and proceeded to France on 29th July 1915, the Division concentrating near Tilques. On the 8th July 1916 they transferred with 110th Brigade to 21st Division. They were in action in the Battle of the Somme, including the Battle of Morval, in which the Division captured Geudecourt. In 1917 they were in action during the German retreat to the Hindenburg line, the Arras Offensive, the Third Battle of Ypres and the Cambrai operations. In 1918 they fought on the Somme, then moved north and were in action during the Battle of the Lys, in which they suffered heavily. On 28th June 1918 the 8th Leicesters was reduced to cadre strength with troops transferring to the 7th Leicesters. The cadre transferred to 25rd Division and returned to England. On 7th July they were absorbed by the 14th Battalion, West Riding Regiment.

E. Burnham

Edwin was born in Clipston in Jul/Aug/Sept 1884. His parents were George Burnham and Elizabeth Warren.

In 1891 the family was living in East Farndon: George (38, general labourer), Elizabeth (41), Thomas David (10, scholar), Francis J (8, scholar) and Edwin (6, scholar).

In 1901 the family was living on Harborough Road, East Farndon (a few houses away from the Allen family): George (48, general labourer), Elizabeth (51), Thomas (20, porter) and Edwin (16, general labourer).

In 1911 the family was living in East Farndon: George (58, farm labourer), Elizabeth (61) and Edwin (25, cowman on a farm).

Edwin (noted as Edward) was a private in the 8th Battalion, Leicestershire Regiment. He enlisted in Market Harborough. His army number was 23826. He was killed in action in France and Flanders on 3rd May 1917, aged 32, and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial, Arras, France, Bay 5.

In Memory of Private Edward Burnham

23826, 8th Bn., Leicestershire Regiment who died on 03 May 1917

Remembered with Honour

Arras Memorial

E.F.Hood


Edward Thesiger Frankland Hood was born in Nettleham, Lincolnshire. His birth was registered in Lincoln in Jul/Aug/Sep 1880. His parents were Sinclair Frankland Hood and Grace Elenor Swan.

In 1881, aged 1, Edward was living with his parents and 2 older sisters: Grace M Hood (3) and Dorothy Agnes Hood (2). On the day of the census they were visiting his maternal grandparents (Charles T and Susan Swan) at Sausthorpe Hall in Spilsby, Lincolnshire.

In 1891, aged 11, he was a pupil at a school in Cobham, Surrey. The Head was a vicar called Louis Herbert Wellesley Walkley.

In 1899, an entry in Kelly’s Directory states that he was a 2nd Lieutenant in the Royal Artillery.

In 1906, aged 26, Edward married Marjorie Blanche Dalglish (aged 19) at St Georges, Hanover Square, London. They went on to have 2 children: John Sinclair Frankland Hood (1908 - 1996) and Nancy Margaret Hood (1911 - 1974).

In 1911, the family was living at Westfield House, West Haddon, Rugby, a house of 16 rooms. They had 3 servants living with them. Marjorie was born in Rugby, so this was presumably close to her parents. Edward was 31, Marjorie 24, John 3 and Nancy 3 months.

Edward was a keen huntsman and sometimes rode with the Belvoir Hunt. He had fought in the Boer War and was a Captain of the Lincolnshire Regiment. In 1911 he was appointed Deputy Director of the Northern Remounts, which included Leicestershire.

On 13th February 1912 an article was published in the Market Harborough Advertiser and Midland Mail about the United Counties Hunt Ball, which Captain and Mrs Edward Hood attended. It was hosted by members of the immediate hunts: Pytchley, Woodland Pytchley and Quorn, and held at the Market Harborough Assembly Rooms. There were house parties at all the nearby country houses, and Edward and Marjorie were guests of JH Clarke & his son JJ Clarke of Hillside, Leicester Road, Market Harborough (now rebuilt as Birtley Coppice). The younger Clarke was the local commandant of the Remount Depot and also Fire Chief. Also staying there were Sir Charles and Lady Lowther (Sir Charles was Master of Pytchley Hounds, Brixworth), Capt. Gooch, Capt. Milres, Miss Fieldings, Major and Mrs Robinson, Miss Mann, Capt. Hayley and Mrs and Mrs Baillie. The Hoods also attended the 1914 Ball in their own right.

In the Cox archive of papers [DE5167] is a 1912 booklet, in which is reference to a lease for £100pa from F G Cox [of Symingtons] to Capt. Edw. Frankland Hood of a dwelling house premises “on the east side of Main St, E Farndon, which is currently undergoing alteration.” Lease dated 6 Feb1912 [DE 5167/319(ii)] Capt. EF Hood’s 1912 address is North Heath, Newbury, Berks. The house they rented could have been Grey Walls, which was owned by FG Cox at the time. FG Cox lived at Orchard House.

In 1914 Marjorie was robbed of a pair of binoculars in Melton Mowbray, and her address was given as East Farndon. The Army Remount Service had a depot at Melton Mowbray, so she had clearly been visiting Edward.

On 13th October 1914, the local paper gave a list of those who were then known to be in war service. They include Captain Hood of the Remount Department. On 2nd March 1915 it was reported that Hood had been promoted to Major.

On the 22nd December 1914 the local paper reported a ‘patriotic entertainment’ given at the school in East Farndon (there was no village hall then). ‘A large audience included the Belgian temporary residents (= refugees) and their hostess, Mrs Hood’. Also, ‘A family of Belgians has arrived and have been provided with rooms by Mrs Hood. They will be maintained from funds contributed by the village residents.’

Marjorie was a nurse in the British Committee, French Red Cross:

Source Citation for UK, WWI Service Medal and Award Rolls, 1914-1920 WWI Service Medal and Award Rolls, 1914-1920

Name: Marjorie B Hood Military Year: 1914-1920 Rank: Nurse. Medal: Awarded British War Medal and Victory Medal. Regiment or Corps: British Committee, French Red Cross. Other Records: Marjorie B Hood – British Committee, French Red Cross.


F. Pollard

Frederick was born in East Farndon on 10th February 1881. His parents were Roger Norman Pollard and Jane Vials. He was baptised in East Farndon on 23rd July 1895 alongside younger brother Roger.

In 1881 Frederick was 2 months old, and the family lived in East Farndon: Roger (42, farm labourer), Jane (38), Minnie (12, scholar), Charles (9, scholar), Ellen (7, scholar), Lilley (4, scholar), Florence (2), James (2) and Frederick (2 months).

In 1891 the family was still living in East Farndon: Roger (52, agricultural labourer), Jane (49), Charles (18, general labourer), Florence (17, scholar), James (12, scholar), Frederick – noted as Fred (10, scholar) and Roger (7, scholar).

In 1901 the family was still living in East Farndon (in Back Street): Roger (68, cattle monger on farm), Jane(59),  Fred (20, coach smith’s apprentice), Roger (18, labourer) and granddaughter Minnie Ford (11). They lived a few doors away from John Cotterill.

In 1911 Frederick was 30 and was already enlisted in the army. He enlisted in Northampton. He was a gunner, serving with the No 17 Company, Royal Garrison Artillery and was based in Guernsey in the Channel Islands. His army number was 23130.

Frederick died from his wounds in France on 9th April 1918, aged 37. He is buried in St Sever Cemetery Extension, Rouen, Part 1V


One man is recorded on the plaque in the church but not on the War Memorial:

John Cockerill

John was born in Naseby in 1876. His birth was registered in Brixworth in Oct/Nov/Dec 1876. His parents were William and Susan Cockerill.

In 1881 the family lived in the butcher’s shop, Brixworth: William (30, master butcher), Susan (28) and John H (4).

In 1891 the family lived in East Farndon: William (41, butcher), Susan (39), John (15) and Susannah (7).

In 1897 John (21) married Elizabeth Billingham (20) in East Farndon. John was working as a railway porter.

In 1901 John (26) and Elizabeth (23) were living in Back Street (Lane?), East Farndon with their daughter May (10 months) and John’s aunt Matilda Robottom (75). John was working as a railway porter. They lived a couple of houses away from Fred Pollard.

In 1911 John (35) and Elizabeth were living in Ansley, Warwickshire (where Elizabeth was born) with daughter Elizabeth May (10). John was working as a repairer of roads in a colliery.

John enlisted in the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, 6th Battalion in Nuneaton. He was a private and his army number was 11657. He was killed in action in France and Flanders on 18th February 1916, aged 40. His effects of £6 4s 1d were paid to William Whitehead.


The following are recorded on the War Memorial as having served and survived:

J. Belton

C. Bradley

J. Broughton

H.L. Broughton

J. Burnham

E. Burton

J. Clifford

J.W. Gordon

F. Humphrey

H. Humphrey

W.P. Jarman

H.M. Lonsdale

W. Looms

J.C. Perry

R. Pollard

W. Pollard

R. Rogers

S.R. Smith

W.G. Tebbutt

F.W. Tebbutt

G.J. Tebbutt

J. Warr

W.E. West

W. Elliott

A.G. Reeves

J. Rogers

W. Ross

J. Wintersgill


The following are reported in the local newspaper of the time to have served but do not appear on the War Memorial:

Robert Spence

Henry Allport

Joe Davenport

W.R. Eades

Leonard Croft

A.C. Tomlin






 








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