East Farndon Village


From Thatch to Tiles and Slate

 

Over the last century there has been a considerable change in the appearance of the village. In medieval times the majority of houses would have been thatched, with cob or mud walls. Only a very small number would have been stone. Presumably the Manor House (now The Hall) would have been the first stone house. Then in the seventeenth century two substantial houses were built. Gradually as the use of brick increased in the eighteenth century, more houses of some status were built. This must reflect increasing prosperity among some sections of the population. Some of these larger houses were still being roofed with thatch.

 

 

A fire at one of the village's thatched cottages in the 1920s. All thatched houses have since been demolished or re-roofed in other materials. The Bell Inn, on the right, was one of two pubs, both of which have since been closed and turned into private houses.

 

Many of the humbler cottages survived through to the twentieth century and there are photographs which show them. They look quaint but of course lacked what came to be considered essential facilities. So by the middle of the century they had all been demolished. The larger houses which had been thatched were re-roofed in tiles or slate. So today East Farndon has no thatched houses and is largely a brick-built village.

 

This pair of thatched cottages, one with its entrance at the rear, were on Main Street. They were demolished in 1950.

 

This pair of thatched cottages, one with its entrance at the rear, were on Main Street. They were demolished in 1950.

 

The village was once largely self-sufficient with its own shops, school and pubs. These facilities were gradually lost during the twentieth century.

 

A view down Main Street from near the former Bell Inn, taken in 1910. Thatched roofs predominate, but in the twenty-first century there are none

 

 






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